HOT INSULATION :
In hot conditions, the greatest source of heat energy is solar radiation.[14] This can enter buildings directly through windows or it can heat the building shell to a higher temperature than the ambient, increasing the heat transfer through the building envelope.[15][16] The Solar Heat Gain Co-efficient (SHGC)[17] (a measure of solar heat transmittance) of standard single glazing can be around 78-85%.[18] Solar gain can be reduced by adequate shading from the sun, light coloured roofing, spectrally selective (heat-reflective) paints and coatings and various types of insulation for the rest of the envelope. Specially coated glazing can reduce SHGC to around 10%.[12] Radiant barriers are highly effective for attic spaces in hot climates.[19] In this application, they are much more effective in hot climates than cold climates. For downward heat flow, convection is weak and radiation dominates heat transfer across an air space. Radiant barriers must face an adequate air-gap to be effective.
If refrigerative air-conditioning is employed in a hot, humid climate, then it is particularly important to seal the building envelope. Dehumidification of humid air infiltration can waste significant energy. On the other hand, some building designs are based on effective cross-ventilation instead of refrigerative air-conditioning to provide convective cooling from prevailing breezes.

COVERING MATERIAL :
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